July 2, 2024

Subclavian Artery Stenosis: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

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Subclavian Artery Conditions

a medical model of the back of a human body

Subclavian Artery Stenosis

Subclavian artery stenosis is the narrowing of an artery that provides blood to the arm, typically due to plaque buildup. This condition affects about 2% to 7% of people in the United States and is more common on the left side. Many people with subclavian artery stenosis may not experience symptoms because other arteries can compensate for the reduced blood flow.

While some patients may have concurrent coronary artery disease, treatment options for subclavian artery stenosis include angioplasty +/- stenting and surgical management (bypass). The prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis can be as high as 18% in those with peripheral vascular disease.

Right subclavian artery - The Anatomy of the Arteries Visual Guide, page 16 (of 57)
"Right subclavian artery - The Anatomy of the Arteries Visual Guide, page 16 (of 57)" by Rob Swatski is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/.

Where is the Subclavian Artery Located?

The subclavian arteries are located below the clavicles, with the right subclavian artery starting at the brachiocephalic artery and the left subclavian artery starting at the aortic arch. Both subclavian arteries travel away from the middle of the body between the anterior and middle scalene muscles, extending to the first rib where they become axillary arteries. They supply blood to various parts of the body, including the brain, heart, chest wall, and upper back muscles.

Subclavian Artery Occlusion

Subclavian artery occlusion can result in a discrepancy in blood pressure between arms, with blood flow being supplied retrogradely from the contralateral vertebral artery to the affected ipsilateral artery. While some patients may experience symptoms such as arm claudication and neurological issues, many are asymptomatic. Diagnosis can involve imaging studies like MR angiography and CT angiography to confirm the presence of subclavian stenosis. Treatment for symptomatic patients may involve surgical bypass or endovascular intervention, while asymptomatic patients may benefit from antithrombotic therapy and lifestyle modifications.

Left subclavian artery - The Anatomy of the Arteries Visual Guide, page 17 (of 57)
"Left subclavian artery - The Anatomy of the Arteries Visual Guide, page 17 (of 57)" by Rob Swatski is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/.

Diagnosis and Treatment

"Left subclavian artery, anterior view - The Anatomy of the Heart Visual Atlas, page 24 (of 40)" by Rob Swatski is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/.

Diagnostic Methods

Radiographic features such as ultrasound and CT/MR angiography can be used to visualize the degree and extent of stenosis. History-taking to assess risk factors is also crucial. Duplex ultrasonography is an option but may depend on the operator's skills.

Treatment Options

Treatment for subclavian artery stenosis and occlusion can involve angioplasty +/- stenting and surgical management (bypass) for symptomatic patients. Asymptomatic patients may benefit from antithrombotic therapy and lifestyle modifications like controlling hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and quitting smoking.

Condition Description Prevalence Treatment Options
Subclavian Artery Stenosis Narrowing of an artery that provides blood to the arm, often due to plaque buildup. 2% to 7% in the general population, up to 18% in those with peripheral vascular disease. Angioplasty +/- stenting, surgical management (bypass).
Subclavian Artery Occlusion Complete blockage of the subclavian artery often leading to discrepancies in blood pressure between arms. Rare, often related to underlying atherosclerotic disease. Surgical bypass, endovascular intervention, antithrombotic therapy, lifestyle modifications.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What should I do if I can't access the NCBI website?

If your access to the NCBI website has been blocked, it's likely due to possible misuse or inefficient use of E-utilities rather than a security issue. Contact your system administrator to help restore access and learn how to interact better with the NCBI website to prevent future access issues.

How does a block on the NCBI website affect the research community?

The block aims to ensure that one user's activities do not negatively impact the ability of other researchers to access and use the NCBI website efficiently. It helps address and prevent misuse to ensure fair access for all users.

What is Subclavian Artery Stenosis?

Subclavian artery stenosis is the narrowing of the artery that provides blood to the arm, often due to plaque buildup. It affects about 2% to 7% of the population in the United States and is more common on the left side. Many individuals may not experience symptoms because other arteries can compensate for the reduced blood flow.

What are the symptoms of Subclavian Artery Stenosis?

Subclavian artery stenosis symptoms can vary. Some patients might not show any symptoms due to other arteries compensating for the reduced blood flow. However, symptoms can include blood pressure discrepancies between arms, arm claudication, and neurological issues. Imaging studies like MR angiography and CT angiography can assist in diagnosis.

Where is the Subclavian Artery located?

The subclavian arteries are located below the clavicles. The right subclavian artery begins at the brachiocephalic artery, and the left subclavian artery starts at the aortic arch. Both arteries travel between the anterior and middle scalene muscles, extending to the first rib where they become axillary arteries.

What is Subclavian Artery Occlusion?

Subclavian artery occlusion involves a blockage that causes a discrepancy in blood pressure between arms. Blood flow is retrogradely supplied from the contralateral vertebral artery to the affected artery. Symptoms can include arm claudication and neurological problems, although some patients may be asymptomatic. Diagnosis often involves imaging studies, and treatment may range from surgical bypass to lifestyle modifications for asymptomatic cases.

What are the diagnostic methods for Subclavian Artery conditions?

Diagnosing subclavian artery conditions can involve imaging methods such as ultrasound, CT angiography, and MR angiography. Duplex ultrasonography can also be used, though it depends on the operator's skill. Taking a comprehensive history to assess risk factors is also crucial.

What is the treatment for Subclavian Artery Stenosis?

What is the treatment for subclavian artery stenosis? Treatment options for subclavian artery stenosis include angioplasty with or without stenting, and surgical management such as bypass surgery for symptomatic patients. For asymptomatic patients, antithrombotic therapy and lifestyle modifications like controlling hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and quitting smoking may be beneficial.

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